Medical Policy: An Iffy Matter in the Global Context

Ecks’ piece on the Anti-canacer drug Glivec, addresses a key issue with medical policy: loop holes. What it means to be a Global Corporate Citizen is simply a conflation of corporate philanthropy and corporate responsibility. The conflation of the two terms allows for corporations like Novartis to use the corporate policy on social responsibility to promote their selfish motives that benefit only the corporation. The idea is that as long as it ‘looks’ like they are doing ‘good work’ or ‘charitable work’, then in the minds of the policy enforcers (the courts), the corporation is free of all ill will. The act, or the end product, defines the quality of the intent. On another note, it seems to be the case that it is the loop holes in the medical policy of countries like India that allows for a global detriment in policy. For instance, if it is the case that drugs in India can be made at a cheaper price with higher efficiency and more profit to the pharmaceutical company, then chances are that the making of the drugs will be outsourced. An outsourcing of these drugs will lead to not only changes in policy, i.e. in the States, but also changes in policy that can lead to the inevitable global corruption of the drug-making system (considering that the policy in India on drug making is not as regulated as the drug making in the United States. Lastly, in the US, a corporation is considered, under the law, a person, however, if the intent is not taken into consideration and if this particular person can have a global impact, the policy will fail to reach all possible aspects of the drug making process.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s